Skip to main content
SearchLoginLogin or Signup

Reviews of "Accidental Exposure to Body Fluids Among Healthcare Workers in a Referral Hospital in the Security-Challenged Region of South West Cameroon"

Reviewers: A Walton & M Powell (Duke University) | 📗📗📗📗◻️ • M S Islam (University of New South Wales) | 📒📒📒◻️◻️

Published onApr 03, 2024
Reviews of "Accidental Exposure to Body Fluids Among Healthcare Workers in a Referral Hospital in the Security-Challenged Region of South West Cameroon"
key-enterThis Pub is a Review of
Accidental Exposure to Body Fluids Among Healthcare Workers in a Referral Hospital in the Security-Challenged Region of South West Cameroon
Accidental Exposure to Body Fluids Among Healthcare Workers in a Referral Hospital in the Security-Challenged Region of South West Cameroon
Description

Abstract Introduction Accidental exposure to body fluids (AEBs) increases the risk of blood-borne infections among susceptible HCWs. While 90% of the AEB reported occur in developed nations, developing countries bear 90% of the burden of healthcare associated infections, especially those of sub-Saharan Africa. Social insecurity may contribute further to the vulnerability of HCWs. Our study sought to determine the prevalence, reporting and management of AEBs among HCWs in the security-challenged Region of South-West Cameroon.Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out from February 2023 to April 2023, at the Buea Regional Hospital. Following informed consent, a 28-item interviewer-administered questionnaire to HCW was used. Data was entered and analyzed using R Statistics version 4.3.1.Results Out of the 230 HCWs that were approached, 200 were responded for a participation rate of >85%. The prevalence of AEB was high (93%). Exposures occurred while administering injections (37%), during blood sample collection (16%), delivery (11%), surgery (10.2%) and washing. The main risk factors for AEB included female gender (aOR=2.86) and those exercising in the medical (aOR=5.95), pediatrics (aOR=10.5), obstetrical (aOR=22.6), dental (aOR=26.3) units. Only 46.8% of AEBs were reported. Post-exposure management was carried out for 67.2% of the reported cases. Most HCW were unaware of the existence of an Infection Control Committee within the study setting, corroborating gaps in the observance of Standard Precautions.Conclusions Most HCWs experienced AEBs over the last year. There is a need to sensitize and enforce the observance of universal precautions among HCW of the Buea Regional Hospital. Such measures should be extended to other health facilities in related settings.

To read the original manuscript, click the link above.

Summary of Reviews: This preprint details an observational study that looked at accidental occupational exposure to body fluids in health-care workers in South West Cameroon and found a very high level of exposure. In general, reviewers found this preprint to be reliable, but could benefit from clarification on study operational definitions and limitations. 

Reviewer 1 (AnnMarie W… & Melissa P…) | 📗📗📗📗◻️

Reviewer 2 (Md Saiful I…) | 📒📒📒 ◻️◻️

RR:C19 Strength of Evidence Scale Key

📕 ◻️◻️◻️◻️ = Misleading

📙📙 ◻️◻️◻️ = Not Informative

📒📒📒 ◻️◻️ = Potentially Informative

📗📗📗📗◻️ = Reliable

📘📘📘📘📘 = Strong

To read the reviews, click the links below. 

Comments
0
comment
No comments here
Why not start the discussion?