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Reviews of "Prevalent and Persistent New-Onset Autoantibodies in Mild to Severe COVID-19"

Reviewers: T O Harville (University of Arkansas) | 📒📒📒 ◻️◻️ • M J Fritzler (University of Calgary) | 📒📒📒◻️◻️ • S Sridhar & J Y Tsoi(University of Hong Kong) | 📒📒📒◻️◻️

Published onMar 26, 2024
Reviews of "Prevalent and Persistent New-Onset Autoantibodies in Mild to Severe COVID-19"
key-enterThis Pub is a Review of
Prevalent and persistent new-onset autoantibodies in mild to severe COVID-19
Prevalent and persistent new-onset autoantibodies in mild to severe COVID-19
Description

Autoantibodies have been shown to be implied in COVID-19 but the emerging autoantibody repertoire remains largely unexplored. We investigated the new-onset autoantibody repertoire in 525 healthcare workers and hospitalized COVID-19 patients in five time points over 16 months using proteome-wide and targeted protein and peptide arrays. Our results show that prevalent new-onset autoantibodies against a wide range of antigens emerged following SARS-CoV-2 infection in relation to pre-infectious baseline samples and remained elevated for at least 12 months. We demonstrated associations between distinct new-onset autoantibodies and neuropsychiatric symptoms post-COVID-19. Using epitope mapping, we determined the main epitopes of selected new-onset autoantibodies, validated them in independent cohorts of neuro-COVID and pre-pandemic healthy controls, and identified molecular mimicry between main epitopes and the conserved fusion peptide of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike glycoprotein. Our work describes the complexity and dynamics of the autoantibody repertoire emerging with COVID-19 and supports the need for continued analysis of the new-onset autoantibody repertoire to elucidate the mechanisms of the post-COVID-19 condition.

To read the original manuscript, click the link above.

Summary of Reviews: The study explored prevalent and persistent new-onset autoantibodies in individuals with mild to severe COVID-19, identifying potential biomarkers associated with post-COVID conditions, including neuropsychiatric symptoms. Notably, the study detected anti-TRIM63 and anti-CCDC63 IgG antibodies, which displayed molecular mimicry with a conserved amino-terminal peptide of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike glycoprotein. However, reviewers raised concerns regarding the specificity of biomarkers attributed to COVID-19 and the exposure of peptides used in the analysis. Despite these concerns, the findings suggest that novel autoantibodies identified in the study may serve as important biomarkers for predicting the onset and persistence of autoimmune diseases in individuals affected by COVID-19.

Reviewer 1 (Terry O H…) | 📒📒📒 ◻️◻️

Reviewer 2 (Marvin J F…) | 📒📒📒 ◻️◻️

Reviewer 3 (Siddharth S… & James Yiu-Hung T…) | 📒📒📒 ◻️◻️

RR:C19 Strength of Evidence Scale Key

📕 ◻️◻️◻️◻️ = Misleading

📙📙 ◻️◻️◻️ = Not Informative

📒📒📒 ◻️◻️ = Potentially Informative

📗📗📗📗◻️ = Reliable

📘📘📘📘📘 = Strong

To read the reviews, click the links below. 

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