Skip to main content
SearchLoginLogin or Signup

Reviews of "Assessing the Effect of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in the Prevention of Post-Acute Sequelae of COVID-19"

Reviewers: K Hashimoto (Chiba University) | 📘📘📘📘📘 • E Mills (McMaster) | 📒📒📒◻️◻️

Published onJan 05, 2023
Reviews of "Assessing the Effect of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in the Prevention of Post-Acute Sequelae of COVID-19"
key-enterThis Pub is a Review of
Assessing the Effect of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in the Prevention of Post-Acute Sequelae of COVID-19
Description

AbstractImportancePost-acute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC) produce significant morbidity, prompting evaluation of interventions that might lower risk. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) potentially could modulate risk of PASC via their central, hypothesized immunomodulatory, and/or antiplatelet properties and therefore may be postulated to be of benefit in patients with PASC, although clinical trial data are lacking.ObjectivesThe main objective was to evaluate whether SSRIs with agonist activity at the sigma-1 receptor lower the risk of PASC, since agonism at this receptor may serve as a mechanism by which SSRIs attenuate an inflammatory response. A secondary objective was to determine whether potential benefit could be traced to sigma-1 agonism by evaluating the risk of PASC among recipients of SSRIs that are not S1R agonists.DesignRetrospective study leveraging real-world clinical data within the National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C), a large centralized multi-institutional de-identified EHR database. Presumed PASC was defined based on a computable PASC phenotype trained on the U09.9 ICD-10 diagnosis code to more comprehensively identify patients likely to have the condition, since the ICD code has come into wide-spread use only recently.SettingPopulation-based study at US medical centers.ParticipantsAdults (≥ 18 years of age) with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis date between October 1, 2021 and April 7, 2022 and at least one follow up visit 45 days post-diagnosis. Of the 17 933 patients identified, 2021 were exposed at baseline to a S1R agonist SSRI, 1328 to a non-S1R agonist SSRI, and 14 584 to neither.ExposuresExposure at baseline (at or prior to COVID-19 diagnosis) to an SSRI with documented or presumed agonist activity at the S1R (fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, or citalopram), an SSRI without agonist activity at S1R (sertraline, an antagonist, or paroxetine, which does not appreciably bind to the S1R), or none of these agents.Main Outcome and MeasurementDevelopment of PASC based on a previously validated XGBoost-trained algorithm. Using inverse probability weighting and Poisson regression, relative risk (RR) of PASC was assessed.ResultsA 26% reduction in the RR of PASC (0.74 [95% CI, 0.63-0.88]; P = 5 × 10−4) was seen among patients who received an S1R agonist SSRI compared to SSRI unexposed patients and a 25% reduction in the RR of PASC was seen among those receiving an SSRI without S1R agonist activity (0.75 [95% CI, 0.62 - 0.90]; P = 0.003) compared to SSRI unexposed patients.Conclusions and RelevanceSSRIs with and without reported agonist activity at the S1R were associated with a significant decrease in the risk of PASC. Future prospective studies are warranted.Key pointsQuestionDo Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors with and without agonist activity at the sigma-1 receptor (S1R) prevent Post-Acute Sequelae of COVID-19?FindingsIn this retrospective study leveraging real-world clinical data that included 17 933 patients, a 28% reduction in risk of PASC was observed for S1R agonist SSRIs and a 25% reduction in risk of PASC was observed for non-S1R agonist SSRIs, both versus controls, using a computable phenotype to define PASC.MeaningSSRIs may play a role in managing the long term disease burden of COVID-19. Future prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings and evaluate potential mechanisms of action.

To read the original manuscript, click the link above.

Summary of Reviews: This preprint discusses the importance of SSRIs and their effect on long-COVID.. Reviewers find this study to be potentially informative and strong, highlighting the study’s contribution to new treatments for PASC.

Reviewer 1 (Kenji H…) | 📘📘📘📘📘

Reviewer 2 (Edward M…) | 📒📒📒 ◻️◻️

RR:C19 Strength of Evidence Scale Key

📕 ◻️◻️◻️◻️ = Misleading

📙📙 ◻️◻️◻️ = Not Informative

📒📒📒 ◻️◻️ = Potentially Informative

📗📗📗📗◻️ = Reliable

📘📘📘📘📘 = Strong

To read the reviews, click the links below. 

Comments
0
comment
No comments here
Why not start the discussion?