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Reviews of "A Weaponized Phage Suppresses Competitors in Historical and Modern Metapopulations of Pathogenic Bacterial"

Reviewers: J Moura de Sousa & Y Le Cras (Insititue Pasteur) | 📗📗📗📗◻️ • L Lin (Tzu Chi University) | 📘📘📘📘📘

Published onApr 12, 2024
Reviews of "A Weaponized Phage Suppresses Competitors in Historical and Modern Metapopulations of Pathogenic Bacterial"
key-enterThis Pub is a Review of
A weaponized phage suppresses competitors in historical and modern metapopulations of pathogenic bacteria
A weaponized phage suppresses competitors in historical and modern metapopulations of pathogenic bacteria
Description

Abstract Bacteriophages, the viruses of bacteria, are proposed to drive bacterial population dynamics, yet direct evidence of their impact on natural populations is limited. Here we identified viral sequences in a metapopulation of wild plant-associated Pseudomonas spp. genomes. We discovered that the most abundant viral cluster does not encode an intact phage but instead encodes a tailocin - a phage-derived element that bacteria use to kill competitors for interbacterial warfare. Each pathogenic Pseudomonas sp. strain carries one of a few distinct tailocin variants, which target variable polysaccharides in the outer membrane of co-occurring pathogenic strains. Analysis of historic herbarium samples from the last 170 years revealed that the same tailocin and receptor variants have persisted in the Pseudomonas populations for at least two centuries, suggesting the continued use of a defined set of tailocin haplotypes and receptors. These results indicate that tailocin genetic diversity can be mined to develop targeted “tailocin cocktails” for microbial control.One-Sentence Summary Bacterial pathogens in a host-associated metapopulation use a repurposed prophage to kill their competitors.

To read the original manuscript, click the link above.

Summary of Reviews: Reviewers find the evidence for a highly conserved tailocin in Pseudomonas populations compelling. They commend the genomic and experimental approaches, and the demonstration of tailocin-mediated competition in planta. However, they recommend expanding the discussion and analyses to better elucidate the tailocin's mode of action, the relationships between haplotypes, and the co-evolution with O-antigen receptors. Overall, the reviews are very positive, offering constructive suggestions to further enhance the manuscript's impact and clarity.

Reviewer 1 (Jorge M… & Youn L…) | 📗📗📗📗◻️

Reviewer 2 (Ling-Chun L…) | 📘📘📘📘📘

RR:C19 Strength of Evidence Scale Key

📕 ◻️◻️◻️◻️ = Misleading

📙📙 ◻️◻️◻️ = Not Informative

📒📒📒 ◻️◻️ = Potentially Informative

📗📗📗📗◻️ = Reliable

📘📘📘📘📘 = Strong

To read the reviews, click the links below. 

Comments
2
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Charmaine Mia:

That's Not My Neighbor was overwhelmingly positive, with reviewers highlighting compelling evidence for a highly conserved tailoring in Pseudomonas populations.

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Charmaine Mia:

<a href="https://thatsnot-myneighbor.io">That's Not My Neighbor</a> Extremely positive, with reviewers highlighting compelling evidence for a highly conserved tailoring in Pseudomonas populations.